Gobustan & Mud Volcanoes

Gobustan & Mud Volcanoes

Gobustan & Mud Volcanoes

Description

Museum of Petroglyphsis (outdoor museum) – Gobustan or by other name Museum of Petroglyphsis (outdoor museum) located approximately 65 km from Baku.
Prehistoric rock drawings – petroglyphs – are an art “archive” of the human evolution on Earth. The “articles” of such archives are the first transmissions from the human “I” to the outer world. There are a few of such outdoor “archives” in Azerbaijan. One of them, the largest, is located in Gobustan, at the Baku State Reserve of History, Ethnography and Arts, near Baku. It is a rocky massif on the bottom of the southeast part of the Great Caucasus Range, near the Caspian Sea and a modern highway built on the ancient Shirvan road.
In mountains of Gobustan Boyukdash, Kichikdash, Djingirdag and Shighgaya there were concentrated witnesses of the past of azerbaijanian nation of the epoch of Stone Age and ongoing periods – rocky paintings, camp of man, tombstones and etc. The most significant of them are rocky pictures – petroglyphs, carved by primitive men on walls of caves, rocks and stony lumps. The aforesaid primitive monuments of art reflect culture, economy, world outlook, customs and traditions of ancient azerbaijanian people.

Azerbaijan and its Caspian coastline are home to nearly 400 mud volcanoes, more than half the total throughout the continentsş In 2001, one mud volcano 15 kilometres (9 mi) from Baku made world headlines when it started ejecting flames 15 metres (49 ft) high. In Azerbaijan, eruptions are driven from a deep mud reservoir which is connected to the surface even during dormant periods, when seeping water shows a deep origin. Seeps have temperatures that are generally above ambient ground temperature by 2 °C (3.6 °F) – 3 °C (5.4 °F). Lokbatan Mud volcano since 1998 submitted to UNESCO’s World Heritage SIte tentative list.Even CNN Travel included this place to list as one of the world’s 50 natural miracles.